Resources

 Energy Charter Treaty reform: Failure in the first round

Yamina SAHEB

The German Presidency should end the comedy of the modernisation of the Energy Charter Treaty and work on a decision to withdraw en masse from the treaty without further delay.

In a laconic “public” communication from another era, EU citizens and lawmakers were informed about the end of the first negotiation round on the Modernisation of the Energy Charter Treaty (ECT).

 A Blueprint to deliver a healthy, affordable, and sustainable built environment for all

Greening Europe’s homes and public spaces is a crucial element of the EU’s strategy towards climate neutrality, and one of the pillars of the European Green Deal. But to achieve its goals, the EU will need to come up with a comprehensive strategy for energy and resource efficiency while also ensuring that sustainable homes become an affordable solution for all citizens.

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 Sufficiency and circularity: the two overlooked decarbonisation strategies in the ‘Fit For 55’ Package

Sufficiency policies are a set of measures and daily practices that avoid the demand for energy, materials, land, water, and other natural resources over the lifecycle of buildings and goods while delivering wellbeing for all within planetary boundaries.

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 Modernisation of the Energy Charter Treaty: A Global Tragedy at a High Cost for Taxpayers

The Energy Charter Treaty (ECT) is a multilateral investment agreement solely dedicated to protecting foreign investments in energy supply. By January 2020, the Treaty has been ratified by 53 countries and the European Union/Euratom. Under the ECT regime, foreign investors can sue host States through arbitration tribunals, typically, composed of party-appointed private lawyers.

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 Modernisation of the Energy Charter Treaty: A Global Tragedy at a High Cost for Taxpayers

The Energy Charter Treaty (ECT) is a multilateral investment agreement solely dedicated to protecting foreign investments in energy supply. By January 2020, the Treaty has been ratified by 53 countries and the European Union/Euratom. Under the ECT regime, foreign investors can sue host States through arbitration tribunals, typically, composed of party-appointed private lawyers.

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 Modernisation of the Energy Charter Treaty: A Global Tragedy at a High Cost for Taxpayers

A presentation by Dr. Yamina Saheb will highlight the main findings of the report and provide the audience timely analysis of the ECT modernization process before the first negotiation round planned in April 2020.

The presentation will be followed by a panel discussion and an interactive question and answer session with the audience

Event Date: 
12/02/2020 - 15:30 to 16:30
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Venue: 

Online

 It’s time to scrap the Energy Charter Treaty

Yamina SAHEB

The EU taxpayer is the main loser from the continuation of the Energy Charter Treaty which locks Europe into carbon and energy injustice at a high cost to taxpayers.

 Europe’s Green Deal is under threat from Energy Charter Treaty

Yamina SAHEB

The EU and its member states should collectively withdraw from the Energy Charter Treaty, which protects fossil fuel investments, and go to the UN Climate Summit in New York with a call to develop a ‘Treaty for the Non-Proliferation of Fossil Fuels’, argues Yamina Saheb.

The Energy Charter Treaty (ECT) is a multilateral investment agreement which protects investments in the supply of energy. The ECT was signed and ratified by the EU and its Member States in the 1990’s.

 The Energy Charter Treaty - Assessing its geopolitical, climate and financial impacts

The Energy Charter Treaty (ECT) is a multilateral investment protection agreement which protects investments in the energy supply.

For the first time, since the entry into force of the ECT in 1998, the geopolitical, climate and financial impacts are assessed.

The analyses show that:

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 Heatwaves hurt the poor most: time for an EU plan

Yamina SAHEB

Recurring heatwaves across Europe have been most devastating for the poor. New EU institutions have a mandate to make Europe’s energy transition a just one, but this can only be done if a European Marshall plan is implemented to fight climate change and protect the vulnerable.

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